“If you haven’t lived in an energy-efficient home, you don’t know what you’re missing.”

This is the opening line in an article written on October 1st for the Portland Press Herald by Marina Schauffler.

I thought this article hit on a few high points and I thought that it should be shared. First, we love “The Pretty Good House”. We are, of course, happy to help you achieve your dreams to make Net-Zero or Passiv Haus a reality, but what if you just want a house that performs better and doesn’t come with a label.

I loved how Marina put it in her article “Yankee thrift” it kind of makes you pause, but what everyone should know is that there are simple “hacks” that don’t cost more money, but make a world of difference between building a standard code house, and building a pretty good house.

“These houses have sensible design features, orienting primary living areas on the home’s south side and placing spaces like pantries, mudrooms and mechanical areas to the north. Rather than having trendy, pricey building components, they rely on proven elements – like Energy Star kitchen appliances, a tankless water heater or an air-source heat pump.”

Here at Mottram Architecture we put a lot of focus on orientation and “daylight planning” which takes into account how you use your house throughout the day and where those rooms land in the layout. We also try “hacks” like putting vintage windows between rooms to allow natural light into smaller rooms without adding windows the the building envelop. It adds character and reduces consumption and doesn’t cost much.

And I really loved the way she closed the article:

“The year-in and year-out savings are welcome, but it’s not just the economics that make energy-efficient homes so appealing. A green-designated broker, Marc Chadbourne, recently asked a builder of highly efficient homes who buys them and what reasons they offer. The answer he received is one I would echo: “It’s a combination of everything.” Whether you value a healthier living space or reduced energy costs, a smaller environmental footprint or a higher resale value, the promise of greener houses is clear. We all desire and deserve a “pretty good” place to call home.”

The savings, they are welcome. Who doesn’t love to save the money. But aside from saving money, what I hear from my clients and the people who visit their homes is how awesome the space feels. “I could have sold this house 15 times in the first year. People would just stop in and say: That’s so cool” said Patrice Miller of Live Solar Maine. So as we pursue our goal of bringing energy efficient homes to the market in a soulful and creative way we love hearing that others are doing the same and people are starting to ask for it, if not demand, pretty good homes.

We hope you’ll check out this article by Marina and read more about the Pretty Good Home

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